ArtisanSpecialties.Com
Licensed South Carolina Residential Home Builder
A Full Service Residential Remodeling Company
Where Quality Comes First"
Bonded & Insured
All Work Is Guaranteed
803 600 2919




CUSTOM PERGOLA
PICTURES OF A PERGOLA
BACK PORCH PERGOLA
CUSTOM PERGOLA
TURN KEY


Welcome to my new porch pergola page.  After doing quite a few pergolas for different clients I chose the one you will see below.  Not because of the design.  But for the different variables you will encounter when doing any project.  Yes, I do like to show off what I do, but I also like to teach people some of the things they need to know when undertaking projects like I have by their self.  Pease read through some of my different web pages and see if you are doing something like what I have posted to learn more.

There will always be a high demand for back porches, porch additions, and contractors like myself who enjoy designing and building clients custom back yard retreats.  I love the detail involved with custom designed porch columns or pergolas.  The scrolled ends of a pergola reminds me of a Japanese theme back porch, and the thing I love the most is that you can hang all the plants you want on it!

Pictured below is a custom porch pergola measuring approximately thirty feet wide and thirteen feet out.  This pergola was made of number one grade treated wood having no bark edges and no knots that were falling out.  I also waited approximately three months until the treated wood turned gray, and all the preservatives were dried out before painting.  Why wait to paint?  If you paint wet wood, the paint will blister and peel off like dead skin.  There now, did you know that little tidbit?  If you have never been exposed to the situation you might not have known the answer.

CLICK ON ANY OF THE PORCH PERGOLA PICTURES BELOW TO ENLARGE
In the first picture you can see how plain this homeowners back porch looked before our renovation.  After the pergola was built I snapped another picture showing the long lag bolts installed between each of the pergolas ceiling joists.  I made sure that the ceiling could hold a roof system if they ever wanted to install one.  When you spend allot of time in your yard gardening you really need a place to sit back and enjoy your labors.
Here you can see the scrolled front of the pergolas front two x twelve, and the two x two cross frame on the top of the two x twelve.  All treated wood used on this custom pergola is number one grade, meaning no bark edges along with no knots falling out of the wood.  Also visible are the massive twelve inch wide recessed panel columns, with a custom bent and brazed copper top to protect the beautiful columns.  Hiding inside the columns are six x six treaded posts to hold all the weight from the pergola.
You can see the left end of this magnificent pergola with the three outdoor ceiling fans installed.  The switch that controls all of the fans is located in the first column on the right.  It was well over a hundred degrees during the summer when my company undertook this project.  Looking on the porch concrete you can tell how the suns rays have been decreased.
These are close up pictures of the right side of the pergola.  Like many people, these homeowners have made a getaway of their back porch installing an ornate waterfall between the exterior doors for a tranquil escape from the sounds of the city.
With this close up picture of one of the pergolas custom columns you can see the detail that I used on the top and bottom.  You can also see how the concrete pad of the porch has sunk due to water penetrating around the edges of it.  You can also see how I formed and made a level surface for the bases of the columns to sit on because of this offset.  All nails used on this project were either galvanized of stainless steel, with liquid nails between the beam of the pergola.
This is the finished pergola having a rich brown color keeping with an earth tone for the porch decor.  You can see how the owners had custom fabric covers installed for additional privacy.  Our project turned out excellent with no problems … until weeks later.
I received a call from my client saying that my columns had begun to separate at the corners.  Very worried I went on by to take a look.  The porch slab was holding about an inch of water from where I had sealed it to help slow down the concrete slab from dropping any further.  I did not foresee any problems because I formed a masonry support to raise the base of the column up to be level with the brick on the outside.  Bottom line, I fixed the miters of all my columns and repainted.  I will never leave a client with a problem due to my workmanship.
Another few weeks came and went.  Then it happened again. All my columns were coming apart.  I was shocked!  Coming by in the early morning I noticed that the front of the columns were wet, and only the front.  Curious I asked my client if their irrigation system touches the columns.  It did, all the way up to where you see my Lead Man’s finger.  Disturbed that now all the base moulding and some of the other moulding was no longer any good, what was I to do?  Tell my clients they had to pay extra for the damage, or suck it up and fix it one more time?  Look, I feel like this.  I have had the privilege of many people trusting me with their homes.  These are great people who I really enjoyed working for.  Yes I fixed it, but I did say if it happened one more time I would have to charge, “grin”.
You can see from the base that I removed in doing the repairs I believe in glue and nails.  Do you see how the water darkened the treated bottom plate I used next to the masonry?  Also noticeable is the water going up the sides of the square column for the plate.  Just in case there was a problem with ventilation I installed white 3 inch round screen vents on the inside top and bottom for full air flow on the humid summer days of South Carolina.  I loved building this pergola, and I plan on it lasting for quite awhile.  Everything I do I put a piece of myself into.  All of my projects are personal to me, with my client’s satisfaction being the bottom line.  So, have we all learned anything from this?  I have.  1) Look for an irrigation system, and if you do not see one, ask if there is one there.  2) Carry bug spray haha haha haha  3)When the temp. is over a hundred, plan on doing 2 coats of paint.  Even if it says 1 coat on the can.
Bugs do love wet wood.  Especially when the wood has only been there for a few weeks. Death to all wood eating bugs in your home, may you lay out an inviting perimeter of death.  After everything was repaired and I look back at this project, I still laugh.  I had fun.  And I met some really nice people … plus the Mrs. will drive you to the Doctor if you’re stupid enough to cut your leg open with a 3 inch hole saw on my power drill.  Can you say that hurt like ^%gJ$% But, I will leave that story for another time.




PICTURES
Bathroom Vanity
Remodeling
PICTURES
Entertainment Cabinet
PICTURES
Kitchen Cabinets
Stock Cabinets
PICTURES
Fireplace Mantle
Fireplace Design
PICTURES
1 Winder Stairway
2 Prefab Stairway
PICTURES
Trim Moulding
Wainscot
PICTURES
Porch Pergola
Porch Additions
PICTURES
Remodeling
Homes
PICTURES
Foundation Repair

PACKAGE **DEAL**

REMODEL How Much?

REFERANCE For Contractors

CONSTRUCTION LINKS 

CONTACT ARTISAN

MEET THE
OWNER

INSURANCE
WORK

HANDYMAN SERVICES

DISCOUNTED SERVICES

LINK EXCHANGE

HELP STOP
JOBSITE THIEF!

SEARCH
ENGINE SUBMITTING
PICTURES
DESIGNER CLOSETS
FREE
ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS
PROFESSIONAL
RESIDENTIAL CONSULTING

EXIT
Employment

Copyrighted Artisan Specialties 2000 - 2008
Javascript CodeLifter